Forest Fires and Health

Forest FireForest fires can be more dangerous than you might think. Though the most immediate danger comes from the fire itself, the smoke from a fire can harm people up to hundreds of miles away from the actual blaze. During a forest fire, a number of harmful emissions are released into the air in high concentrations, including small particulate matter, such as carbon monoxide, atmospheric mercury, and volatile organic compounds. As these pollutants are released during a fire, winds can spread them further than one might expect, leaving people unprepared or unaware of the health hazards.  Breathing in these pollutants can exacerbate symptoms for those who have lung or heart disease, and even otherwise healthy people can also be at risk for symptoms, such as coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, and headaches.  The longer one is exposed to these pollutants, the higher these risks can be.

We can all do our part to stop wildfires before they start. When camping, make sure to never leave camp fires unattended and douse them fully with water when you are ready to put them out.  During dry summer days, make sure to keep a close eye on barbeques, bonfires and even lawnmowers – they can create sparks that can ignite dry grass.  When fires do occur, you can protect yourself by checking local air quality reports and staying inside when air quality dips.  It is also advised not to do any indoor activity that will add to pollutant levels if possible. This includes using wood burning stoves, lighting candles, and even vacuuming, as vacuums can throw particles that have settled on surfaces back into the air.  Using an air purifier is the best way to keep the indoor air clean, and if you live in a fire-prone area, consider adding an air purifier with a true HEPA filter before fire season starts so that you know you are protected even before pollutant levels begin to rise.

Secondhand Smoke Facts and Statistics Infographic

The Negative Health Effects of Secondhand Smoking

A “passive” smoker is someone who inhales the secondhand tobacco smoke generated by others. Secondhand smoke is a mixture of the residual smoke that comes from burning tobacco and the smoke exhaled by a smoker. Exposure to secondhand smoke is thought to be more harmful than smoking a cigarette directly for the same amount of time. The below infographic details statistics about the negative health effects of secondhand smoke.

You are welcome to use this infographic about secondhand smoke statistics on your own website, please link back to this page or www.rabbitair.com as the source.

All of Rabbit Air’s air purifiers are excellent for smoke removal, secondhand smoke, and the odor from smoke. Cigar Aficionado rated Rabbit Air a top air purifier for smokers,  you can read the article on our site. Choosing the best smoke air purifier for your home is a matter of many factors including room size, filtration needs, unit cost, filter replacement cost, etc. Visit our website to learn more about the air purifier models we offer.

Secondhand and Environmental Tobacco Smoke Facts

Mainstream Smoke is the smoke in the air that is exhaled by a smoker.
Sidesteam Smoke is the smoke in the air from a lighted cigarette, pipe or cigar.
Secondhand Smoke (SHS) is a mixture of the 2 above forms of smoke that come from burning tobacco. This is also known as environmental tobacco smoke (ETS).

SHS worsens asthma and asthma-related problems in up to 1,000,000 asthmatic children.

The immediate effects of SHS may include: headache, dizziness, eye irritation, cough, sore throat, nausea

Long term effects may include: stroke, asthma, dementia, cognitive impairment, lung cancer, breast cancer, cardiovascular problems

About 3,400 nonsmoking adults die of lung cancer each year as a result of breathing secondhand smoke.

SHS effects on children may include: allergies, olfactory diseases (nasal), circulatory problems, asthma, respiratory problems, behavioral problems, Crohn’s disease, sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)

An estimated 35,000-62,000 deaths occur annually from heart disease in people who are not current smokers, but who are exposed to environmental tobacco smoke.

11% of children 6 years and under are exposed to ETS in their homes on a regular basis (4 or more days per week)

SHS contains thousands of toxic chemicals including: ammonia, butane, chromium, lead, carbon monoxide, cyanide, polonium, formaldehyde